MORE EXCERPTS

The End Was Only The Beginning

LIVING WITH CANCER

Show More

In  the  spring  of  2006,  Mary  Alice  was  growing  weary  of  her job  at  

Reinhardt  College  but  couldn’t  help  but  push  herself too  hard  —  typical  of  her  approach  to  work.  By  this  time  I had  developed  an  ability  to  feel  her  

emotions  in  my  soul  and could  read  the  looks  on  her  face  like  an  open  

book.  Her  eyes alone  told  me  she  was  more  than  a  little  tired  and  stressed,

so  I  insisted  we  take  a  weekend  getaway.  Our  destination  was

the  King  and  Prince  resort  on  St  Simons  Island,  one  of  the

Golden  Isles  off  the  Georgia  coast.

 

A  weekend  of  rest  and  relaxation  helped,  but  simply delayed  the  visit  to  

the  doctor  she  knew  was  in  order.  She had  felt  lethargic  for  weeks  and  wasplagued  by  stomach pains  —  the  result,  it  turned  out,  of  diverticulitis.  Mary Alice had  never  had  a  big  appetite,  and  as  she  went  on  a  course  of

antibiotics  it  dwindled  to  almost  nothing.  All  she  could  get down  was  a  

small  serving  of  fruits  and  vegetables,  and  the lower  her  energy  dropped  

and  the  longer  her  stomach  pains continued,  the  more  concerned  we  

became.

 

A  second  course  of  antibiotics  failed  to  quell  the  pains, and  her  doctor  

suggested  a  CT  scan.  After  the  radiologist reviewed  the  scan  he  called  us  

with  the  last  words  we  wanted to  hear:  “You  may  have  a  problem,  and  

you  need  to  get  to  an oncologist.”  Mary  Alice  immediately  called  Gwynne  

Brunt  (a radiologist  and  a  friend  of  her  and  her  former  husband),  and

Dr.  Brunt  wasted  no  time  in  recommending  Matt  Burrell, an  OB/GYN  cancerspecialist  who  had  a  great  reputation throughout  the  Southeast.

 

Our  trip  to  Dr.  Burrell’s  office  confirmed  our  worst fears.  Mary  Alice  was  

yet  again  diagnosed  with  cancer,  this time  ovarian  cancer  at  stage  three.  

Crushed,  we  spent  that night  in  bed  holding  hands,  praying  and  crying.  

Neither  of  us had  any  idea  of  what  to  expect,  and  the  uncertainty  made  the

horrible  news  all  the  worse.  Ovarian  cancer  carries  with  it  a high  mortality  rate,  in  part  because  it  is  usually  diagnosed  at stage  three  or  later.

 

After  her  appointment  with  Dr.  Burrell,  she  was scheduled  for  surgery  on  

the  Friday  of  Memorial  Day weekend.  We  both  wanted  to  get  the  operation over  with  as quickly  possible  —  and  in  typical  fashion,  Mary  Alice  not

only  expected  the  most  aggressive  treatment  but  was  eager to  get  started.  

Our  nights  together  were  filled  with  prayer, tears  and  anxiety,  but  I  tried  

my  best  to  stay  strong  for her.  After  surviving  breast  cancer  six  years  

earlier,  she  was determined  to  beat  this...  but  lurking  in  the  background  was

the  mortality  rate  of  women  with  ovarian  cancer.

 

When  the  day  of  the  surgery  came  —  May  26,  at Northside  Hospital,  Dr.  

Brunt  found  me  in  the  waiting  room and  sat  with  me  for  over  two  hours.  Dr.  Burrell  then  cameout  of  the  operating  room  and  gave  us  the  grim  

report  in  full.  I  listened  numbly  as  both  doctors  consoled  me,  and  couldn’t

wait  to  see  the  love  of  my  life.

 

But  I  had  no  choice  but  to  wait...  and  for  an  hour  and a  half.  Awake  but  

groggy,  Mary  Alice  was  finally  pushed on  a  gurney  into  a  private  room.  At this  point  she  was  too medicated  to  feel  pain,  while  my  heart  ached  over  

the  hell she  had  been  through.  This  normally  tough  little  fighter seemed  so  

frail  I  felt  like  a  parent  who  wants  to  ease  the  pain of  a  small  child.  In  

truth,  I  could  do  nothing  but  be  there  for her,  even  if  she  had  no  idea  I  

was  by  her  side.  Silent  prayers and  positive  thoughts  raced  through  my  

mind  as  I  watched her  sleep.  My  soul  mate  was  hurting,  and  I  felt  her  pain

deeply.

 

She  spent  the  next  two  days  in  a  fog,  sometimes summoning  a  weak  voice  

to  ask  for  ice  or  a  drink  of  water  — but  mostly  just  sleeping,  waking  every three  or  four  hours to  press  a  button  activating  another  pain-relieving  

infusion of  morphine.  Her  pain  had  to  be  agonizing,  but  she  never 

complained.  All  I  could  do  was  sit  by  her  bedside,  hold  herhand  and  be  

there  when  she  needed  me,  which  frustrated me  no  end.  I  later  learned  my  feeling  of  utter  frustration  was common  for  caregivers  trying  to  aid  loved  

ones  suffering from  cancer...  but  knowing  this  didn’t  make  it  any  easier.

Copyright 2016     John Bevilaqua
© 2016 by John Bevilaqua. Proudly created with WIX.COM