MORE EXCERPTS

The End Was Only The Beginning

TIME TO GO

Show More

On  that  day  in  early  June,  the  angel  of  death  stood  silently  at the  entrance  to  Room  9  in  the  Intensive  Care  Unit  of  Atlanta’s Northside  Hospital.  The  

critical  care  staff  moved  up  and down  the  long  hallway  grim-faced  and  

tight-lipped,  certain of  what  was  about  to  happen.  They  had  seen  it  all  

before.

 

Tears  flowed  freely  in  the  room.  Dr.  Burrell’s  words  —  “She’s  probably  

already  in  the  light  and  waiting  for permission  to  go”  —  helped,  but  

nothing  made  things  easier for  Elisabeth  and  me.

 

Few  words  were  spoken  as  the  clock  ticked  slowly towards  5:00  p.m.  Mary  Alice,  intubated  and  heavily sedated,  wasn’t  able  to  speak.  But  her  hair  was brushed and  her  nails  were  vivid  red.  The  respirator  pounded  its unyielding drumbeat  in  a  futile  effort  to  sustain  her  life,  and it  was  almost  time  for  

the  end  of  the  earthly  chapter.

 

We  spent  our  final  moments  with  Mary  Alice  — wife,  mother,  grandmother,friend,  ally,  advocate,  lover, professional  woman  extraordinaire  —  stroking  

her  forehead and  hands  and  letting  her  know  she  was  surrounded  by love.  The  medical  team  prepared  for  the  final  moments  and walked  us  through  

the  pain  and  grief  to  follow.  Lis  and  I  were worried  that  Mary  Alice  might  feel  pain,  but  the  medical  staff assured  us  the  morphine  drip  would  keep  

her  comfortable.

 

I  was  also  concerned  that  Mary  Alice  might  think she  was  suffocating;  she  was  claustrophobic,  and  I  didn’t want  her  to  feel  she  couldn’t  breathe.  Again,  her  caretakers assured  me  would  feel  no  discomfort  at  all.

 

In  Room  9  with  Lis  and  me  as  the  clock  struck  five were  Dr.  Burrell,  PennyDaugherty  (Mary  Alice’s  friend  and nurse  navigator)  and  Jessica,  our  angelic ICU  nurse.  Once everything  was  in  place,  Jessica  helped  us  prepare.  Lis  andI positioned  ourselves  beside  Mary  Alice,  me  holding  her  tight in  my  arms  

on  her  right  side  while  Lis  did  the  same  on  the left.  Through  our  tears,  we said  goodbye  as  the  medical  staff removed  the  ventilator  and  increased  the  morphine  drip  rate.

 

Mary  Alice  took  her  last  breath  at  5:13  p.m.  on  June 5,  2014.  The  medical  

team  left  us  alone  with  her  as  we  spoke.

 

Once  Lis  and  I  finished  our  goodbyes  we  asked  Jessica to  come  back  in.  

She  and  her  assistant  Miranda  helped  us finish  removing  the  tubes.  We  

bathed  Mary  Alice  with  wipes and  then  dressed  her  in  a  tank  top  and  her  

favorite  pajamas —  green  plaid.  Our  tasks  complete,  we  authorized  the  

nurse to  call  the  Cremation  Society  to  come  and  pick  her  up.  Lis and  I  took our  leave  so  we  wouldn’t  have  to  see  our  loved  one in  a  body  bag.

 

The  whole  afternoon  Lis  and  I  were  plagued  by  “what ifs?”...  questions  that stayed  with  us  because,  in  the  end,  it actually  wasn’t  ovarian  cancer  that  

took  Mary  Alice’s  life.  It  was  acute  respiratory  failure  caused  by  a  toxic  

reaction to  a  drug  meant  to  reduce  irritation  to  her  liver  but  instead

stiffened  her  lungs  to  the  point  they  could  no  longer  retain oxygen.

 

What  if  her  oncologist  had  changed  her  chemo cocktail  to  one  without  the  drug  that  proved  fatal?  What  if the  2006  pharma  trial  had  miraculously  

cured  her?  In  the final,  and  maddeningly  ironic  analysis,  Mary  Alice  was  

killed by  a  chemotherapy  agent  administered  to  save  her  from cancer.

Copyright 2016     John Bevilaqua
© 2016 by John Bevilaqua. Proudly created with WIX.COM